Czech Takes K1, French C2, Great Britain Women’s C1 at World Champs

“It was a really close C2 final, I hope all crowd and all the canoeing family will never forget about C2, who we are and who we will be,”


The French C2 team of Gauthier Klauss and Matthieu Peche celebrating their win


Czech’s Ondrej Tunka taking the Men's K1 crown


Czech Ondrej Tunka won a shock K1 gold medal after Slovenia’s Peter Kauzer received a late penalty, while Great Britain’s Mallory Franklin stormed to gold in the women’s C1 after just managing to qualify for the final.

Klauss and Peche were the third crew down the course in the final, and picked up a two-second penalty which put a medal in doubt.

But when the Olympic gold medallists, cousins Ladislav and Peter Skantar, fell just 0.07 seconds, the home crowd erupted.

“It was a really close C2 final, I hope all crowd and all the canoeing family will never forget about C2, who we are and who we will be,” Klauss said.

“There is a lot of emotion. We gave everything we have, we are completely exhausted. It’s important because this may be the last race for C2, we can be World Champions for the rest of our lives.”

Tunka qualified ninth fastest for the K1 final after struggling to make the semi-finals, but posted a perfect run of 91.84 to take top spot.

Teammate Vit Prindis was just 0.02 seconds behind for the silver, while Slovenia’s Peter Kauzer crossed the line believing he had won in a time of 90.13, only to attract a late two-second penalty which relegated him to bronze. New Zealand's Mike Dawson, a well-known extreme kayaker, took 7th.

It was Tunka’s first podium finish for 2017.

“I think this was my first good run in the final, I’m very happy for it, but I still don’t know what’s happening now,” he said.

“I felt good. I was a little bit nervous, but on the water I felt really good. No-one expected me to win, I could only surprise so I could really go for it.”

After qualifying fastest for the C1 semi-finals, Franklin had a disappointing run in the semi-finals, squeezing into the final in last position.

But after posting a 109.09 in the final she knew she was a strong chance for a medal, and when three-time world champion, Australia’s Jessica Fox, ran into trouble with three gate touches, the gold was her.

“After quite a tough year it’s really good,” Franklin said.

“I’ve had some really not very good semi-final runs, but I’ve had some good results as well. To be able to come out at the end of the year and do that is really good for me.”





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